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Chief’s View: My charge to you: Do your job

Chief Master Sgt. Kathleen R. Buckner

Chief Master Sgt. Kathleen R. Buckner

Citizen Airman/Aug 2012 -- On one of my first early mornings in the office after assuming my new position, I sat with Lt. Col. Hal Linnean, assistant executive officer for the Air Force Reserve Command commander, discussing the way ahead for the enlisted force. Linnean said the minimum we can ask from our enlisted members is that they do their job. Doing your job has been the topic of my enlisted calls and has become a vital part of my everyday life.
What does doing your job mean to you? Is it conduct, work ethic, competency, quality, personal appearance or quantity? Does it matter what rank, Air Force specialty code, position, level or section you work in?

As members of the Air Force Reserve, we have a responsibility to conduct ourselves with pride and integrity, both on and off duty. Our Air Force core values are there as the foundation for our conduct and service. They bond us together as an organization and as Airmen.

Each one of us is accountable for our own actions, performance and attitude. We must acknowledge the good in ourselves and be proud of our ability and accomplishments. No different is the necessity to look within ourselves to see where we can improve.
Continuous self-improvement will raise not only our self-esteem, but it will make our section, squadron and wing a better teammate in the total force working to accomplish the mission.

We live and work in a rapidly changing environment economically, technologically and socially. We owe it to ourselves, our customers, our co-workers and every American citizen to embrace the strengths these changes bring while remaining steadfast in our core values.

I ask you to do your job first and foremost as an Airman. Take pride in your appearance. We are judged first by our looks and then by our actions. Always remember that you are a wingman, leader and warrior. Practice good order, discipline and military bearing. If you hold yourself in compliance with Air Force standards and hold yourself accountable for your actions and performance, you help reinforce that culture around you.

It is imperative that you do your job as a technician as well. Every AFSC we have in our Air Force inventory is directly or indirectly working toward one goal, and what we do saves lives! We answer the call of our nation and the plea of many around the world for humanitarian and/or wartime support. It is your responsibility to be technically competent so that we can deliver on the promise we have made to ourselves and our nation when we put on this uniform.

Thank you for doing the right things, even when no one is looking. The sacrifices you and your families make so that you can serve are greatly appreciated and not forgotten. You continue to amaze me with your ability, performance and resourcefulness. I am proud to be your voice! So go out there and do your job.